Heavy Duty Magazine interviews Preach Jacobs: “Rap Extraordinaire”

“Rap Extraordinaire” Preach Jacobs Interview
Preach Jacobs , is like the last of a dying breed, he is truly an artist for art sake and shows in his music, his vibe is usually mellow, but his flow is always candid and honest..check him out
HEAVY DUTY:

Thanks for taking time out to interview with us, I have to say that I’ve been a fan of your since I received a bootleg copy of your debut album “Garveyism”, to the official retail of the album release to present. Please let our readers know a little bit about you, in case they don’t know already?

PREACH:

I’m glad to do the interview. My name is Preach Jacobs and I’m an emcee, journalist and photographer from Columbia, South Carolina. I try to stay busy in everything from writing for magazines, doing shows to having my photos in art galleries. I just want to do the things that I love and make it a living.

HEAVY DUTY:

Now like I stated earlier I remember hearing a bootleg of “Garveyism” prior to the official release and became a fan almost immediately, so much so that once the retail version was released I bought a few copies and gave them to friends.

What I liked about the album was that it was refreshing to hear something other than braggadocio for once, how do you feel “Garveyism” was received by the consumer public what were some of the response that you’ve heard after the album dropped?

PREACH:

It’s funny when people approach you about the work that you do, very rarely do they come to you and say “hey, I hated that record.”

The people that’s responded to it enjoyed it and that was my main focus. I believe the “everyman” concept of the record was something people could relate to, because that’s the type of music I wanted to hear. I was surprised when I would speak about the album the amount of people that knew about it.

HEAVY DUTY:

My favorite cut off the album was “Dance” as well as “That Feelin” I think those records would make instant fans out of anyone, but let’s talk about the new project entitled “Maple Street Sessions” how did this come about?

PREACH:

Maple St. Sessions” kind of came about indirectly because of “Garveyism.” I was working with Marc Mac of 4hero and sent “Garveyism” to him. He then sent it to some people to check out and Denz was one of those people. We linked up and just started working on the records casually. There weren’t any deadlines, labels gawking or pressure. It was more or less “let’s just make music” and when we were done we kind of felt that someone may want to put this out. That’s the best feeling.

HEAVY DUTY:

How do you feel you’ve grown as an artist from “Garveyism” to the new album?

PREACH:

One of the biggest things that sticks out is efficiency. When I did “Garveyism” my business partner and executive producer DJ Keesh and I were doing everything guerilla style. We didn’t have a string of people to offer their ears for the project, it was just us. So, we would do studio dates and record and listen and then go back again and fix things.

That may sound good as far as trying to make the best record possible, but it’s not very cost effective. Now, I do tons of pre-production at home. Also, learning ways to get my point across more accurately become things that feel simpler now. It comes with continuing it.

HEAVY DUTY: You seem to have a natural affinity for the more mellow type of sounds have you experimented with other producers out and tried out different sounds?

PREACH:

It’s funny because one of my favorite groups is M.O.P. But I guess I tend to gravitate towards more mellow styled production. I’m a jazz freak. I have probably four our five framed Miles posters in my house.

But I do have a desire to go outside of that and a new project I’m working on titled ‘Dread Zeppelin’ with a production team called Helium Music is that type of harder Dilla-esque type of sound. My goal is to just express what I feel because if you look at my record collection and my inspirations, it’ll reflect that.

HEAVY DUTY: I recently peeped the video for “Fallin” and loved it, the track and the visual meshed well together, I saw it once and had to buy the record, I also peeped a YouTube clip of you and 9th Wonder (of Little Brother fame) hanging out, I have to ask, has any music come from this union as of yet?

PREACH:

I’m working on it. I think the great thing about that video was that it wasn’t about business. 9th is working on a great project with David Banner and they’re working with a very talented illustrator who’s like a mentor to me named Sanford Greene (www.sanfordgreene.com) and it was just a casual hanging out.

It was surreal sitting at a kitchen table shooting the shit and talking about music we love and hated. The evening ended at T. I think the fact that it was so normal meant more to me than hounding for beats. Because the camaraderie is what I want. Being peers is what I want. He’s a busy dude, and I’m working on things and if the right opportunity approaches, I definitely want to bless some tracks. So, my fingers are crossed.

HEAVY DUTY:

Have you started any plans for an album #3, yet? If. So let’s us know as Editor-in-Chief I am a HUGE fan?

PREACH:

I have tons of projects and guest appearances planned for 2010. The ‘Dread Zepp’ project is coming out later this year on HiPPNOTT Records, I have a project with Marc Mac titled “Passport” that we’re working on and something with DJ Vadim that’s in the works.

I also have a plan for a full-length that I want to take my time with and try to get the producers I want on it. I want the 9th Wonder, the Black Milk and the Exiles on there. It’ll take some time to try and get it together but dammit, I’m up for the challenge. Speak it into existence.

HEAVY DUTY:

I also see your name out there quite a bit as a journalist as well, reppin’ the culture which of the two worlds do you enjoy most journalism or music?

PREACH:

It’s an even toss up. I love both dearly. Really I couldn’t have one without the other, so the talents are co-dependent. There’s connections I’ve made to get my music written about in magazines because I’m a writer, or when I was younger and couldn’t find people to write a bio for me etc. I did that shit myself. So, it helped me be proficient in other areas that help with the common goal: Get the exposure I need.

HEAVY DUTY:

Another quality of yours that I feel goes underrated is the fact that you can hold down an album dolo, or with very limited feature guests, that something you just don’t see anymore these days, why do you think that is?

PREACH:

I think that people feel that other people have to sell their albums these days. I would love to work with other people and “Garveyism” I had a collab I was working on with Stic.Man but time tables got mixed up. Usually I just don’t like waiting on people.

I have the ability to handle the song arranging, photography, graphics and do press releases on my project. So, the idea of waiting for people is fucking irritating. But the newer stuff I’m working on, there’s a few selected collabs that is in the works that I feel will get the people excited.

HEAVY DUTY:

Before we get outta here I’ll come clean and say that in preparation for this interview I’ve made some copies of “Garveyism” for a few producers that I know and I will try to send them your way, but how can fans, fans to be or stands get a hold of you if they like what they hear?

PREACH:

Thanks for the love and passing the word. Usually artists get pissed off about bootlegging or downloads, but to me I have so many things that I’m working on outside of music that the exposure in any of the fields will help with the Preach Jacobs branding. People can get in touch with my pretty easily.

My official site is http://www.preachjacobs.com and they can listen to the music, download it, watch the videos and hit me up. I’m excited to be an artists that people can talk to easily and directly and that’s something I want to hold on to for as long as I can. “Maple St. Sessions” is out now on R2 records so you can get it from my site or get it digitally at all your online retailers. Not to mention, we’re getting “Falling” on Centric soon. So, pass the word on and I will continue to do my part: Make honest-dope-ass music.

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