Album Review: Electric Wire Hustle – Every Waking Hour @ SoulCulture.co.uk

Electric Wire Hustle – Electric Wire Hustle (Every Waking Hour) by Preach Jacobs
Very rarely has there been an album that has exceeding the expectations of this reviewer. It may be even rarer that there’s an artist that I haven’t heard about make such a massive impact on me and my listening habits. Fortunately, Electric Wire Hustle have exceeded with both.

Their album, titled Every Waking Hour, is a homage to soul giants like Marvin Gaye and Donny Hathaway yet embodies an intimate knowledge of Dilla-esque Hip Hop music that sparked the neo soul movement (even though that term seems exhausted). Proving that there’s more hailing from New Zealand than the ‘Flight of the Concords’, this album is an array of excellent production thick with hypnotic melodies and boom-bap inspired drums.

Tracks like “Walk On” featuring Stacy Epps and “Gimme That Kinda” and “Again” are all diverse but maintaining a common goal: creating the absolute perfect post-millennium soul album. This record sounds like what would have happened if Soulquarians put out a full-length (how we can still dream). Stand out track “Buy Some Land, Put A House On It” starts off with heavy horns and creeps into a distorted genius of electronic sensibilities with the beauty of simple and effect songwriting. Strong melodies, strong hooks – and let the music dictate the rest.
The group’s brand of what they call ‘Future Soul’ (not sure if they coined the phrase but is befitting) is a refreshing re-interpretation of what the genre should look and sound like. During the ’70s when Motown was churning out classics from Marvin to Stevie and other places had Curtis Mayfield and more, seems to be a resurgence of that energy. It’s an exciting time for soul music simply proving that people that exclaim that there isn’t any good music out there just aren’t looking hard enough.

Electric Wire Hustle are at the forefront of talented musicians dedicated to putting out superior music and it’s a damn shame that the airwaves aren’t flooded with what this album offers, because it would well be worth it. What an injustice.
–PJ

Advertisements